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nkel follows the second ever treat on c- max next, a discussion of the state of american education. then connecticut governor donal malloy talks about early childhood education programs in his state. speaksan manuel santos about his country' trade agreement with the u.s.. >> in a recent ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the
coalition now? >> ok, so when you poll the public on things like education, jobs -- people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnik's recent blog post, which i think was not in "atlantic" but in "politico"? sorry. i think it is totally right that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard, and play by a set of fairness rules, you should do ok. and our guidepost was -- are our kids, the next generation, are they doing better than we are? that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in 2013, chris christie won in new jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe won in virginia, walsh in boston, deblasio in new york. toledo, the person who was pro- public education -- >> could you speak up? >> sorry. the person who was pro-education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have grea
of the american federation of teachers, spoke about the report. she spoke about the efforts to improve education. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreateni
done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
home offer access to everything from education, to health care, to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history -- a belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months. so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all- time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles -- to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for
people are coming and make sure they check in. we do find education is a key way of protecting children. if you get children into school, it's a daily mechanism for teachers and outside people check are they withdrawing? are they fed properly? do they need other things? behind the greatest protection is to make sure the schooling us back and get kids back in school. whether they are moving to family site for schools and apollo would be key for the future. but the support for recovery phase, shelter is going to be a key area. we were lucky the church actors have been trained in disaster risk reduction. they knew how to register, how to do triage in certain areas. we need to continue processes is philippines continue to be hit by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year e
. they had been offering a manufacturing education program for 12 years and had 98% to 100% placement rate. we have 12 community colleges. it makes no sense in a state that is number two per capita in submarines and construction. almost all of it is high-value added as opposed to lower value added. we were not reshaping our schools to produce the human capital. >> did you find out why not? >> yes, it was outside the box. it was outside people's educational box. we now have added three additional community colleges. that model is being used to rebuild the high schools, which the state runs. yes, we are changing. >> thank you, i really appreciate it. i want to thank you for all the school safety measures. rick alluded to secretary duncan's piece. has the federal government become irrelevant to the work you are doing, or is there a role the federal government can play that complements your role? -- complements the role the state and local government can play? >> let's go back to the comments about the $100 million grant program. even if you don't get one of those grants, it is a learning expe
years is a direct result of economic insecurity now. it has led, for spm, to education cuts that have harmed children in low-income school districts. reversing those decisions can still have an enormous impact." but under president obama, america's spending more money on education than any other nation in the world. also, taxes have been going up. and we have record debt. but the left wants more spending and even higher taxes. simply put, the big government spending machine has not helped the economy very much. but again, liberal theory trumps results. >> the idea that so many children are born into poverty in the wealthiest nation on earth is heartbreaking enough, but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. >> well, it certainly offends me. if children are not getting a good education or do not have proper health care, i'm offended. but you cannot bankrupt the entire nation on some ideological quest for income equality. in a capit
that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
for potentially addictive substances? did just say no work? does education work for substances of abuse? the answer is no. question two -- can we afford to wait when health care will be bankrupted to chronic metabolic disease? we have got 13 years, people, and we have to do something now. not wait for more research. we have the research. we have what we need. policy what do we do? there is called targeted prevention. that is treat the patient, right? treat the obese person. except for one thing. we've just learned that there are more nonobese people who are sick. it is targeted to the individual. the benefit to risk ratio is high. the weaknesses is the medicalization of prevention, which is hard. behavior medication, which is impossible. cost feasibility and limited success across the board. but it is not targeted. it is public health prevention we need. what are the strengths there? it is radical. it is going to work because we will make it work. it's powerful, because everyone is onboard. environmental modification, fix the environment, not fixed behavior. that is what our data show a
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
. >> the idea that a child may never be age to escape that poverty because she lacks decent education, healthcare, o that should offend all of us and it should hell us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat. the combined trends of increase inequality and decreasing mobility poses a fundamental threat of our american dream, our way of life. >> here to discuss the inequality and prospect of a minimum wage hike, louis from cornell, do you accept the president's argument that income and equality are jeopardized? in. it's a tremendous difference from the experiences that we had from post-war period. it's the fundamental challenge for our society. not in terms of making sure every american who has a job earns enough to live but for those at the top. all that money piling at the top has nowhere to be invested. this is the challenge, the challenge of investment that doesn't just produce profit for the few but jobs for the many. >> stagnating income. the past 40 years, how does that track with the decline of influence with the labor movement in this country? >> it's exactl
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
. >> the idea that a child may never escape the poverty because they lack decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, it should offend all of us and compel us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> there's a public polling unit and it was found that the president's approval rating among a core constituency that got him elected, that 19-24-year-old, a 41% approval rating. most concerning for the affordable care act is the poll asked young people will they enroll in the affordable care act. this group of young invincibles is key to have their involvement to make it work. 47% of the millennials 18-29 said they will not enrol. 57% it's approved. greater than the national average among the entire population. >> mike viqueira at the white house. >>> to illustrate the gap the highest 1% saw income rise an average of 31%. for everybody else it was less than one ha
in the workshop and educators can get lesson plans to use in the classroom. >> you don't use sugar for any of these things, right? sugar has seen a big decrease in the last five weeks. sugar prices have dropped pretty steadily in the last five weeks. there's nothing surprisingly in the 12 days that uses sugar, right? >> if you remember last year, becky, we had the drought in the summertime which drove up food prices and grain prices. >> right. right. >> which caused the bird costs to go up. this year both energy and food prices are down. >> we were going to play a little music or something so the total price is, did you tell us that already, $27,993.17. up 7.7% this year, joe. >> 7.7. inflation. all right, jim. thank you. >> good to see you. happy holidays. >>> folks, it is cyber monday. that's when people return to work and do some shopping online. we're going to talk about ecommerce prospects when "squawk box" comes right back ♪ ♪ the most wonderful time of the year ♪ capital to make it happen? without the thinking that makes it real? what's a vision without the expertise to execut
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
american education system this morning is not looking good for the next generation. in fact an international assessment of teens around the world shows u.s. students slipping even further behind. the united states ranking 26th in math scores, dropping one point since 2009, which was the last time the test was given. the u.s. is at 21st place in science, which is a drop of four spots and dropped three spots to 17th in reading. by contrast, several asian countries and cities, including japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. education secretary arne duncan addressed the findings early this morning. >> it is a picture of educational stagnation. the brutal truth that urgent reality must serve as a wake-up call against educational complacency and low expectations. we're running in place as other high-performing countries start to lap us. >> michelle rhee is the ceo and founder of students first and joins us now. michelle, are you surprised by what this new assessment is saying about american students or do you think that this is on track, knowing what you kn
the real problem here is public education, if you have never had health insurance before, you don't know how it works and you've never applied for it and never done anything, you need to be educated and there's a whole lot of people out there who have not had health insurance before or how to use it. >> there are a lot of people who don't have computers and a lot of people are watching television about this sort of thing, so you have a real public education problem that goes with any major social change like this. it was no different for social security or for medicare or for the drug benefit under medicare. there's always a lot of education that has to be done. >> we know that there's a renewed sense of confidence certainly coming from the white house and certainly coming from democrats who have been anxious about this, and i know that as of tuesday in your state more than 175,000 residents have enrolled in health care coverage since october 1st and we know since november 14th, enrollments have increased by 55%. in your opening remarks from yesterday's committee hearing from the aca imp
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> welcome back, you're watching the news hour in al jazeera. a recap. demanding that the president resign. >>> lebanese government has sent in the army to take control of the northern city of tripoli. prime minister says they will remain there for the next six months. and thailand's prime minister has defended her government amid growing opposition on the street. hospital officials say two protestors were shot and wounded during latest confrontation with police. >>> now it's a multibillion industry that's never out of fashion. but it does have a dark side, tannery officials earn little more than $2 a day. as part of our two part investigation into the industry, rob reynolds went to meet some of the workers in a slum in dacca. >> of the dirty jobs bangladesh is t to survive, these tannery workers are day in and day out amid the rotting corpses of animals. mohamed says he's 14 but lo
much. the education secretary tony called it the picture of stagnation. >> there is a lot of work that needs to be done. >> but to make you feel better these tests aren't that criminal, but the bigger thing to learn is critical thinking. >> higher order thinking. we were just talking about it. >> we were just talking about it. >> it links to reading, comprehension, and hang on to the music, and it links to matthew. >> that's why some advocates say don't freak out about these kinds of tests and comparison because a lot of it based on memorization and the most important is critical thinking. >> thank you. now. >> you've been hearing that detroit has become the largest municipality to file bankruptcy. david, remember us again, how serious are detroit's financial problems? >> it's very serious. it's serious to the point of all the money that the city of detroit takes in to their tax receipts and revenue, $0.40 on the dollar has to go as far as dealing with the debt that detroit has accumulated. if they did nothing that proportion would go up to $0.65 on the dollar. that is money that
health care and education. modernizing infrastructure. and healing. >> his close relationship with leaders like muammar gaddafi and castro drew criticism, he still visited the white houses meeting with three sitting american properties. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met nelson mandela in 2005, when barack obama was a senator. after one term as president nelson mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a number of causes. >> when south africa hosted the world cup tournament in 2010, he made his last public appearance. the crowd honoured him to thunderous ovation. >> his third wife, graca machel, former first lady of mozambique, was at his side during prostate cancer and lingering lung infections. >> never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. the sun never set on so glorious a human achievement. let freedom rain. god bless africa. >> nelson man
. the department of education reports the accrediting commission violated regulations in its review of city college. it says the commission failed to get enough educators on its evaluation team as required. the report does not however recommend taking away the commission's authority. city college stands to lose its accreditation at the end of july. >>> first there was black friday. then there was cyber monday. now there is giving tuesday. giving tuesday was created last year at a ymca in new york city. it's a campaign to create a national day of giving at the start of the holiday season. the idea is to set aside a day for people to give back to their communities either with donations or volunteering. this year more than 7500 groups will be taking part including san jose based ebay. >>> time now 4:47. and a walnut creek business is being forced to close its doors after 26 years in business right at the height of the holiday shopping season. the owner of yogurt park says he's one of many tenants in the portion of broadway plaza known as the back 40, that will have to move out by the end of january. t
the temporary frustrations of the affordable care roll out. >> a lot of it is education. they don't understand what it is and are afraid to go through the process. >> for andy peak the partial government shutdown created confusion and fear about the affordable care act. >> i didn't want to punch the bottom and sign up to pay $280-$300, adding it to my meagre month to month income. >> as the dust settles counselling from the music heath alliance allowed him to take a look and sign up. he'll pay around $150 a month. and for a career musician, that could allow him to pursue his passion of performing for the rest of his life. >>> the administration says healthcare.gov is functional for 80% of users. >>> let's get a look at the morning business headlines. european and u.s. banks are expected to be hit with a fine for manipulating key interest rates. reuters says six bangs will be fined more than $2 million. they rigged bench marks determining the cost of lending from mortgages the banks involved. more regulations will be invoked. banks would be banned from doing anything for their own game. the new
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
despite calls for government spending on education and unemployment benefits. cheryl: minimum wage watch out for new york and chicago and the joy. fast-food companies demanding $15 an hour.ill hear from them p next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel tt in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. she loves a lot ofas it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that cou be a q
you the poster child for south africa's education. the mandela family was quoted describing you as the face of the new south africa. what is the face of the young generation of post-apartheid south africa. >> i think the young face of this new south africa is a dynamic face. we don't - our revolution will not be a political one. our revolution will be a revolution driven by innovation and prosperity across all income levels in south africa. we are very dynamic generation. my story is like that of millions of south africans. >> you describe this challenge rising to the challenge of innovation. what about domestically are there changes to that that young people face in south africa as they try to meet a global threshold to be competitive. >> certainly, which is why i believe my story resonates. a challenge is education. more south africans, world class education. the commitment to education, not just education, but achieving excellence. it's a challenge that i am sure my peers will adopt in the next couple of years. >> speaking of achieving educational excellence. is it true that
was in some ways accidentally privileged by being able to get a missionary education, and he started out life essentially with a tremendous sense of self-confidence inspired by his local community. and to take him from that position which makes him an aspiring lawyer, by his early 30s he's already rising the ranks of the anc only marks the ways in which he evolved as an individual. and i think we have to hold that in place because he lived so long that he was able to draw on so many strains of thought. so, yes, he went through a period where he embraced africanism or black nationalism to a point where the notion of race first many the tradition of a marcus garvey in the united states, for example, this notion that black people have to solidify. and yes, the anc, there was tension there. >> such a great point, he lives to be nearly 100 years old. his trajectory for change is very different from that of a king who was assassinated while still a young man. one quick question then more after the break. not only do we misremember mandela, we misremember ourselves in relationship to mandela. we now
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
with a second look at an education story with big implications for both students and teachers. it's about a new set of standards known as the common core. our special correspondent for education, john merrow, reports. >> you glis can start. >> freedom of speech should mean what it mean, freedom of speep, shouldn't be limitations on freedom. >> i disagree. >> reporter: students in the center of the room argue their case. >> but you have no proof. >> 30 seconds. >> 18 members on the side-lines offer support. >> they're passing notes saying you should ask this followup question. or look at this page in your text so that you can reference this piece of evidence to support your idea. >> we have power but we also have power. >> reporter: to prepare theo for the debate the 8th graders have read several articles about freedom of speech. >> you can't just say what you are saying because you feel like that's rightment you need to like have evidence about it. >> you said that the government, that we have more power than the government. >> reporter: teacher erin gary keeps score. >> kids collect points for
deep, deep, deep cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, it's a picket. >>
in providing education, counseling, care to people with aids and hiv. overseas, pope francis marked world aids day. he addressed thousands of people who gathered at st. peter's square. the pope called on catholics around the world to pray for those suffering from aids and hiv. he also asked people to pray for the doctors and researchers working to find treatments and a cure for that disease. funeral services were held in south carolina today for a postal worker who was shot and killed in prince george's county. family members and friends gathered in rock hill to say goodbye to tyson barnette. he was killed while delivering mail along reed street and landover. relatives say barnette was a good man. >> he is the type of guy that anyone could love. people --cared about we never thought it would happen in our family. >> police are still looking for barnette's taylor. yesterday, officers handed out flyers in the neighborhood where barnett was killed hoping to get some leads. a gunshot was fired aboard a metro train. metro transit police say two men got onto an argument on an orange line train that
their research, when they call us, we can put a good educated--get them in the right vehicle at the right price that fits their need. >> for the commuter, what is the most important thing they should do when they're doing their research on line, they reach out to somebody, contact by your distributorship, look, i understand you're interested in a gmc truck. what information do they need right there, or what are questions that they should ask to be sure they're headed towards a great deal. >> what is a great deal? every manufacturer, everybody has a great deal from $99 a month to zero percent. but customers doing research on the car, they're looking to spend quite a bit of money, especially in the buick, gmc line. they're looking at their options and what will be comfortable for themselves. when they're researching for the car they're looking to talk to somebody who can guide them in the right direction. mostly 88% of people who are out there, they're doing research, and they're trying to fit their needs so when they come in the show room maybe that time is minimized. >> finally-- >> the deal wa
. we are putting billions of dollars into a program which will bring to them education, which will bring to them health, electricity and running water and sewage and all of the other basic amenities which you and i expect of the -- of our authorities to give us. >> tpolicy of moving the bedoui won't become law until the kin he isset passes it. the bedouin says they are determined to stay. israel is unlikely to change their position. there is much more ahead on al jazeera america, including fighting childhood obesity. a new way to get children to lose those extra pounds. >>> being healthy can be fun. >> that's what one doctor is trying to teach kids. morgan radford explains. >> i am not your average doc. exercise is. >> he is known as the hip-hop doc, teaching kids how to eat healthier and he is doing it to a beat. >> a neurologist. >> doctor williams flings born in nigeria. when he came do new york city, he saw the need for a community based approach to healthcare. >> we focus many more resources on healing, on fixing problems than preventing them from starting >> reporter: so
and the courage of those educators who were on the speed of what happened. >> i went to president to newtown, and the grief was tangible. it was a physical thing you could feel. it is difficult to talk about even right now. in the last few weeks, there was an information, there was haunting details from the shooter who was clearly a young man suffering from sight mental health issues, and yet his mother, nancy lanza kept weapons in the house, took her son to the shooting range, she even planned to buy him a gun for christmas last year. she says, quote, you would want treatment for someone like that. he was isolated from everyone but his mother, and she did not have the understanding. i know it is sensitive because she is the one that he killed that day, but is that mother correct? should nancy lanza have stepped up more? >> nancy lanza probably needed help herself. and it certainly, as a parent, of four children, i can speak eternally about the challenges of parenting. not in this kind of situation, but easy to say in hindsight what she should have done. the point is what society should have
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
of the dynamics here, why this is happening? are hospitals doing their part to help to educate people as far as what's going on with this? >> they are. they are working hard to let people know what the dynamic is. part of the debate has to be not just about hospitals and governors but the business communities in these places saying if we're going to be competitive, if we're doing to have a strong educated workforce that can go to work in the morning and be health y, we have to make sure we support essential hospitals in every way we can. that business community has got to step up to the plate in these states. >> doctor, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >>> coming up new details in yesterday's early morning train wreck that left four dead. we'll have an update after the break. if i can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner
be given one year to fix its own problems. the department of education reports the accrediting commission violated regulations in its review of city college. the commission failed to get enough egg educators on its evaluation teams as required. the report does not recommend taking away the commission's authority. city college stands to lose its accreditation at the end of july. >>> time now 5:46. let's get people moving out the door. hey sal you were keeping an eye on the bay bridge earlier. everything okay out there now? >> yeah, we got lucky dave and pam because there was a crash up there. no one was seriously injured which is always the good news. second of all it didn't stay that long in the lanes. as we look at the bridge and all that, it doesn't look that different from what it normally would look like. in fact, this is kind of a typical delay for about this time of the morning. maybe about a 5-minute delay before you make it on the bridge, and the metering lights should be on pretty soon. again, the crash is not really changing things on the bridge. a little windy up there, just sa
was a smart man, a trained man, an educated man and he also stressed the need for that. you can't know what's right unless you know what's wrong. so you can't be in a position to demand what's right before you can criticize what's wrong. so he is staying on top of that. he also learned the best way to overcome your enemy is to be smarter. the best way to unite your forces is to be able to give credit where it belongs. he would say he served with me as well as in prison. steve, he did not to go prison because he was killed. but the sacrifices he made. so mandela was able to unite the forces of good wherever they were. whether it was in the other places, in the urban dwellings of johannesburg or capetown. he was able to speak to the high and the low. to let them know it was not just for a few but for all. and did he so not looking out for anything for himself but sharing with others. he is a moral for us, the likes of which we will have a very difficult time seeing a replacement any time soon. >> a lot of people are too young to remember the bitter debate in the 1990s about how to deal with s
for their grandkids' educations... they chose a partner to help manage their wealth... one whose insights, solutions, and approach have been relied on for over 200 years. that's the value of trusted connections. that's u.s. trust. [ bagpipes and drums playing over ] [ music transitions to rock ] make it happen with the all-new fidelity active trader pro. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades when you open an account. yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with new fedex one rate, i could fill a box and ship it for one flat rate. so i knit until it was full. you'd be crazy not to. is that nana? [ male announcer ] fedex one rate. simple, flat rate shipping with the reliability of fedex. >>> triple digit advance of almost 180 points. trading action with bob pisani, he joins me here at post 9 on the floor of the nyse. we posed the question this morning, is good news finally good news. >> yeah. >> the market is acting as if it is. but it's an interesting reaction. >> it's a surprising reaction. first of all not the number that's sdprising. a lot of peo
is educating the consumer about how healthcare works, how health insurance works, and how the tax credits work. because that's what makes somebody a knowledgeable consumer. that's what we want. that's what we need when people come on down site. >> that depends on advertising, promotions and getting people to go to the site in the first place. are the numbers on the connecticut site what you thought would be? >> they are, but what is past is past. we did fine the last couple of months, but we're looking for december to get us up over 60,000 members if we can. because at the end of the year, before the january 1st time frame. so yeah, what's past is hopefu hopefully prologued for us. but december is going to be very busy. >> what is the information that consumers should have on hand when they go to the connecticut website and where do consumers run into trouble with just their own information? >> gee, that's a great question. understanding about your family make up, when i say that, social security numbers, birth dates. going back and understanding what you made in the last couple of years so yo
. the education department told the country's biggest loan servicer sallie mae that removes the government services despite they be under investigation by 3 federal agencies and awaiting impending enforcement due to unlawful practices. director richard core dray says quote by making sure the companies comply with federal consumer law we can ensure the marketplace for consumer loans is operating more effectively. $1.2 trillion outstanding debt is now the second largest source of household debts. more than 85 percent of that comes from federal loans. hope this plan helps things out. >> diane macedo, thank you so much. >> the time about 15 minutes until the top of the hour. still to come the city bans this girl from selling mistletoe to raise money for her braces. wait until you hear what they told her to do instead. >> call it an early christmas gift. someone is leaving tips around the country to the tune of thousands of dollars. >> wouldn't that be a great gratuity. >> it would. >> i can hardly wait to hear about that. coming up are new cutbacks making it harder for military members to surv
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
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